Principles of Emergent Democracy

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I feel that Mitch Ratcliffe's Principles of Emergentism goes fundamentally adrift in the middle section, as it gets dragged into voting proxies and decision making. The beauty of emergent democracy, to my mind, is its inherent lack of organisation. Here are the sections I agree with:

* Because the lower cost of communications and the logistical infrastructures available around the world allows groups to address their own needs or the needs of others in more efficient and targeted ways, it is no longer necessary for majority rule to dominate all social, economic and political decisions. Instead, we are at the beginning of a collaboration of many minorities.

* Power can be used for good or evil, regardless of the system that wields it, so emergentism strives to bring all perspectives and parties to every issue to the table in a world where the cost and complexity of making connections has fallen by orders of magnitude since the founding of the United Nations and, even, World Trade Organization. Every decision must be representative of the concerns of people [and everything else] impacted by the results.

* Every individual has the right to participate in any decision that will have an impact on their lives and, since the global environment is a single complex system, each person has the right to express their opinion and vote on every issue.

* Debate and compromise, not violence, are the preferred means of resolving differences of opinion. Violence carried out by any individual or force against a significantly weaker opponent is a crime against humanity; violence in general, while a human habit, should be reduced and ultimately eliminated from society.

* Emergentism is politics for the people by the people that transcends national boundaries, cultural and ethnic differences, religious dogma and personal prejudice by identifying shared interests and facilitating collaboration using modern communications and transportation. It is virtual community embedded in a physical world with its eyes wide open to the realities of emerging global and local identities.